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A new connection

On October 26, the Port of Palm Beach entered into its 19th sister-Port partnership–this time, with the Port of Cap-Haitien in Haiti. It happened thanks to state Rep. Al Jacquet (District 88) or, actually, as he said, to his legislative aide, Kesnel Theus. Both natives of the Caribbean island, Rep. Jacquet and Mr. Theus both travel to Haiti often and, as the Representative said, they both hope that a “strong, cohesive, lasting relationship” will occur between the two with streamlined operations, smooth information exchanges and cargo and cruise line growth. To learn more about the Port’s other sister-port partnerships, most in the Caribbean, click here. And to learn more about Rep. Jacquet, pictured, who will begin his second term in the Florida Legislature this fall, click here.

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‘Existing while black’: news and satire

“Have you ever been followed in a store? Have you been pulled over for no apparent reason? Has someone called the police on you because of the color of your skin?” Those are questions the Huffington Post wants answered. The nationally known website has a category of news called ‘HuffPost Black Voices,’ which covers the national black community and has begun an #ExistingWhileBlack project that is seeking stories from black people across the country. Click here to learn more–and to send in your story. Similarly, the New York Times, believe it or not, is doing a parallel, though satirical, project: a hotline for white people to call when they “can’t cope with black people living life near them.” The hotline is a partnership between the iconic paper and comedian Niecy Nash. Watch the funny, tongue-in-cheek infomercial here.

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‘Black Wall Street’ is back–again

It is confirmed: the locally produced play ‘Black Wall Street’ is a hit! West Palm Beach-based Producer/Director/performer Hallie Balbuena–we call her The Drama Queen–learned last week that the play will perform January 11-12, 2019, at the Black Heritage Festival in Tampa. The statewide draw makes sense. The play sold out each of the three times it played this year in Palm Beach County–in March and in July–and people are still talking about it, Ms. Balbuena says, because the story resonates. “We are so excited,” she says, adding, “I’m also focused on the Kravis Center for 2020 or even 2021 for the 100-year anniversary of the massacre.” The story certainly remains relevant: a white mob destroyed the wealthy black business district in 1921 in Tulsa, Okla., that came to be known as ‘Black Wall Street’ and, just last week, the Tulsa Mayor announced efforts to further unravel the covered history of the attack. Read about that here. The good news: the story is being told. And about that Black Heritage Festival in Tampa Bay? It’ll be held from January 10-20, 2019, and features a wide variety of entertainment, community discussions and, as we now know, at least one hit play. Click here to learn more.

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Trayvon Martin Foundation awards men of change

The list of honorees has not been fully made public, but but we do know who is receiving a Circle of Fathers’ ‘Trailblazer Honors’ award from the Trayvon Martin Foundation: young activist minister Bryce Graham. Prophet Bryce, as he is known, will receive his recognition at the event, which starts at 7 p.m. tonight at the Embassy Suites by Hilton in Fort Lauderdale. The Trailblazer Honors were created by the Foundation to honor men in south Florida for contributions to social justice and minority empowerment. Prophet Bryce, who lives in West Palm Beach, is the central Florida regional director of the National Action Network, founded by the Rev. Al Sharpton. For event tickets and other information, click here. To learn more about the Foundation and its work, here and, to learn more about Prophet Bryce, here. And remember: the six-part documentary created by business mogul Jay Z, titled ‘Rest In Power: The Trayvon Martin Story,’ comes on at 10 p.m. every Monday on the Paramount Network. It premiered July 30.